• Acoustic Spatial Capture-Recapture (aSCR) and the Cryptic Cape Peninsula Moss Frog Arthroleptella lightfooti Metadata 

      Louw, Marike (2018-04-04)
      All the raw data and some of the processed data (up until the completion of the MSc) for the aSCR MSc by Marike Louw is in this repository. The raw data includes the raw recordings, datasheets from the field and the "estlocs" ...
    • The acute hypoxic ventilatory response: Testing the adaptive significance in human populations 

      Terblanche, J.S.; Tolley, K.A.; Fahlman, A.; Myburgh, K.H.; Jackson, S. (Elsevier Inc, 2005)
      The acute Hypoxic Ventilatory Response (HVR) is an important component of human hypoxia tolerance, hence presumably physiological adaptation to high altitude. We measured the isocapnic HVR (L min¯¹ %¯¹) in two genetically ...
    • Adapting to climate change: a perspective from evolutionary physiology 

      Chown, S.L.; Hoffmann, A.A.; Kristensen, T.N.; Angilletta Jr., M.J.; Stenseth, N.C.; Pertoldi, C. (Inter-Research, 2010)
      Much attention has been given to forecasting the likely effects of ongoing climate change on biodiversity. A large and often contentious literature has developed about how changes in species’ ranges should be modelled and ...
    • Adaptive divergence in Darwin’s race: how coevolution can generate trait diversity in a pollination system 

      Zhang, F.; Hui, C.; Pauw, A. (2013)
      Understanding how reciprocal selection shapes interacting species in Darwin’s coevolutionary race is a captivating pursuit in evo- lutionary ecology. Coevolving traits can potentially display following three patterns: (1) ...
    • Adaptive diversification in coevolutionary systems 

      Hui, C.; Minoarivelo, H.O.; Nuwagaba, S.; Ramanantoanina, A. (Springer International Publishing Switzerland, 2015)
      Coevolution can trigger frequency-dependent selection by reciprocal effects on the fitness of involved species. Through directional and disruptive selection, coevolution can lead to rich evolutionary possibilities. It can ...
    • Adaptive evolution in invasive species 

      Prentis, P.J.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Dormontt, E.E.; Richardson, D.M.; Lowe, A.J. (Elsevier Ltd., 2008)
      Many emerging invasive species display evidence of rapid adaptation. Contemporary genetic studies demonstrate that adaptation to novel environments can occur within 20 generations or less, indicating that evolutionary ...
    • Adaptive rather than non-adaptive evolution of Mimulus guttatus in its invasive range 

      van Kleunen, M.; Fischer, M. (Elsevier GmbH, 2008)
      Adaptive and non-adaptive evolutionary processes are likely to play important roles in biological invasions but their relative importance has hardly ever been quantified. Moreover, although genetic differences between ...
    • Additions to the barnacle (Crustacea: Cirripedia) fauna of South Africa 

      Biccard, A.; Griffiths, C.L. (2016-08-24)
      The purpose of this paper is to document recent additions to the South African barnacle (Cirripedia) fauna. New species records were obtained by examining accumulated collections of unidentified material in the Iziko South ...
    • Addressing a critique of the TEASI framework for invasive species risk assessment 

      Leung, B.; Roura-Pascual, N.; Bacher, S.; Heikkila, J.; Brotons, L.; Burgman, M.A.; Dehnen-Schmutz, K.; Essl, F.; Hulme, P.E.; Richardson, D.M.; Sol, D.; Vila, M. (John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS, 2013)
      We address criticism that the Transport, Establishment, Abundance, Spread, Impact (TEASI) framework does not facilitate objective mapping of risk assessment methods nor defines best practice. We explain why TEASI is ...
    • Adoption, use and perception of Australian acacias around the world 

      Kull, C.A.; Shackleton, C.M.; Cunningham, P.J.; Ducatillon, C.; Dufour-Dror, J.-M.; Esler, K.J.; Friday, J.B.; Gouveia, A.C.; Griffin, A.R.; Marchante, E.; Midgley, S.J.; Pauchard, A.; Rangan, H.; Richardson, D.M.; Rinaudo, T.; Tassin, J.; Urgenson, L.S.; von Maltitz, G.P.; Zenni, R.D.; Zylstra, M.J. (Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2011)
      Aim To examine the different uses and perceptions of introduced Australian acacias (wattles; Acacia subgenus Phyllodineae) by rural households and communities. Location Eighteen landscape-scale case studies around the ...
    • Advancing impact prediction and hypothesis testing in invasion ecology using a comparative functional response approach 

      Dick, J.T.A.; Alexander, M.E.; Jeschke, J.M.; Ricciardi, A.; MacIsaac, H.J.; Robinson, T.B.; Kumschick, S.; Weyl, O.L.F.; Dunn, A.M.; Hatcher, M.J.; Paterson, R.A.; Farnsworth, K.D.; Richardson, D.M. (Springer, 2014-04)
      Invasion ecology urgently requires predictive methodologies that can forecast the ecological impacts of existing, emerging and potential invasive species. We argue that many ecologically damaging invaders are characterised ...
    • Aethomys chrysophilus (Rodentia: Muridae) 

      Linzey, A.V.; Chimimba, C.T. (American Society of Mammalogists, 2008-06-08)
      The genus Aethomys currently includes 11 species, but recent evidence indicates a need for taxonomic revision of the genus. Aethomys chrysophilus (De Winton, 1897) is a muroid rodent commonly called the red veld rat. A ...
    • Aethomys ineptus (Rodentia: Muridae) 

      Chimimba, C.T.; Linzey, A.V. (American Society of Mammalogists, 2008-06-06)
      Aethomys ineptus (Thomas and Wroughton, 1908), commonly called the Tete veld rat, is a medium-sized rodent with a long, sparsely haired tail and spermatozoa with spatulate-shaped heads (unique for all muroid rodents thus ...
    • Afromontane small mammals do not follow the hump-shaped rule: altitudinal variation in the Soutpansberg Mountains, South Africa 

      Taylor, P.J.; Munyai, A.; Gaigher, I.; Baxter, R. (Cambridge University Press, 2015)
      Altitudinal transects of biodiversity are important to understanding macro-ecological patterns. Hump-shaped altitudinal profiles in species richness are a common pattern in terrestrial small-mammal communities studied previously ...
    • Age, growth and reproduction of non-native largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides (Lacépède, 1802) populations in two temperate African impoundments 

      Taylor, G.C.; Weyl, O.L.F. (Blackwell Verlag GmbH, 2017)
      This study aims to improve the understanding of the establishment success of Micropterus salmoides by assessing growth, maturity and reproductive seasonality of two populations from the temperate region in South Africa. ...
    • Alien and native birds in South Africa: patterns, processes and conservation 

      Hugo, Sanet; van Rensburg, Berndt (Springer, 2009)
      The spatial distribution of alien species richness often correlates positively with native species richness, and reflects the role of human density and activity, and primary productivity and habitat heterogeneity, in ...
    • Alien animals in South Africa – composition, introduction history, origins and distribution patterns 

      Picker, M.D.; Griffiths, C.L. (AOSIS, 2017)
      Background: There is no comprehensive inventory and analysis of the composition, distribution, origin and rate of introduction of the alien fauna of South Africa. Objectives: To provide such an analysis to facilitate ...
    • Alien bamboos in South Africa: a socio-historical perspective 

      Canavan, S.; Richardson, D.M.; Le Roux, J.J.; Wilson, J.R.U. (Springer, 2019)
      Changes in fashions and economic imperatives underlying plant introductions have a profound influence on the movement of species around the world. Using bamboo introductions into South Africa as a case-study, we explore ...
    • Alien conifer invasions in South America: short fuse burning? 

      Richardson, D.M.; van Wilgen, B.W.; Nunez, M.A. (Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2008)
      Alien conifers have been widely planted in the Southern Hemisphere. Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, all with long histories of alien conifer planting, have major problems with invasive conifers (‘‘wildings’’). ...