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dc.contributor.authorFenesi, A.
dc.contributor.authorSándor, D.
dc.contributor.authorPyšek, P.
dc.contributor.authorDawson, W.
dc.contributor.authorRuprecht, E.
dc.contributor.authorEssl, F.
dc.contributor.authorKreft, H.
dc.contributor.authorPergl, J.
dc.contributor.authorWeigelt, P.
dc.contributor.authorWinter, M.
dc.contributor.authorvan Kleunen, M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-13T11:34:28Z
dc.date.available2019-09-13T11:34:28Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationFenesi, A., Sándor, D., Pyšek, P., Dawson, W., Ruprecht, E., Essl, F., Kreft, H., Pergl, J., Weigelt, P., Winter, M. and van Kleunen, M. (2019). The role of fruit heteromorphism in the naturalization of Asteraceae. Annals of Botany 123, 1043-1052.en_ZA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2724
dc.description.abstractBackground and Aims Fruit heteromorphism is considered to be a bet-hedging strategy to cope with spatially or temporally heterogeneous environments. The different behaviours of the fruit morphs of the same species might also be beneficial during naturalization, once the species has been introduced to a new range. Yet, no study to date has tested the association between fruit heteromorphism and global-scale naturalization success for a large set of plant species. Methods We compiled two large datasets on fruit heteromorphism in Asteraceae. One dataset was on native species in Central Europe (n = 321) and the other was on species frequently planted as ornamentals (n = 584). Using phylogenetic linear and logistic regressions, we tested whether heteromorphic species are more likely to naturalize outside their native range, and in more regions of the world than monomorphic species. We also tested whether the effect of heteromorphism is modulated by life history and height of the species. Key Results We show that heteromorphic species were more likely to naturalize outside their native range. However, among the naturalized species, heteromorphic and monomorphic species did not differ in the number of world regions where they became naturalized. A short life span and tall stature both promoted naturalization success and, when life history and height were included in the models, the effect of fruit heteromorphism on the ability to naturalize became non-significant. Nevertheless, among tall plants, heteromorphic ornamental species were significantly more likely to become naturalized in general and in more regions than monomorphic species. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that in Asteraceae the production of heteromorphic fruits is associated with naturalization success. It appears, however, that not fruit heteromorphism per se, but a successful combination of other biological traits in fruit heteromorphic species, namely short life span and tall stature, contributes to their naturalization success.en_ZA
dc.language.isoenen_ZA
dc.subjectAlien speciesen_ZA
dc.subjectAsteraceaeen_ZA
dc.subjectCompositaeen_ZA
dc.subjectdispersalen_ZA
dc.subjectfruit heteromorphismen_ZA
dc.subjectheterocarpyen_ZA
dc.subjectinvasivenessen_ZA
dc.subjectmonocarpyen_ZA
dc.subjectnaturalizationen_ZA
dc.subjectnon-native speciesen_ZA
dc.subjectseed heteromorphismen_ZA
dc.titleThe role of fruit heteromorphism in the naturalization of Asteraceaeen_ZA
dc.typeJournalArticlesen_ZA
dc.cibjournalAnnals of Botanyen_ZA
dc.cibprojectNAen_ZA


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