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dc.contributor.authorKruger, Natasha
dc.contributor.authorMeasey, John
dc.contributor.authorVimercati, Giovanni
dc.contributor.authorHerrel, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorSecondi, Jean
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-28T13:09:37Z
dc.date.available2020-09-28T13:09:37Z
dc.date.created2019en_ZA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2882
dc.description.abstractIn amphibians, spatial sorting progressively enhances the dispersal capacities of dispersing stages in expanding populations but may enhance or limit the performance of the earlier non-dispersing stages. Phenotypic traits of non-dispersing tadpoles and metamorphs can be coupled, through carryover effects and trade-offs, or decoupled to dispersal traits in adults. We used the globally invasive amphibian, Xenopus laevis, to examine whether spatial sorting of adult phenotypes affects the phenotype of larval stages to metamorphosis in the core and at the periphery of an invasive population in France. We combined common garden laboratory and outdoor experiments to test the effect of parental pond location (core or periphery) on morphology, development and survival to metamorphosis and found no differences between tadpoles. After metamorphosis, the only difference observed in either of the experiments was the larger body size of metamorphs from the periphery, and then only when reared in the laboratory. Differences in metamorph size may indicate that a shift of dispersal traits occur after metamorphosis in X. laevis. Thus, our findings illustrate that decoupled evolution through spatial sorting can lead to changes of X. laevis adult phenotypes that would enhance dispersal without affecting the phenotype of tadpoles before metamorphosis.en_ZA
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityKruger, Natasha
dc.languageEnglishen_ZA
dc.rightscopyrighten_ZA
dc.subjectAnura, decoupling, development, dispersal, metamorph, morphology, Pipidae, survival, tadpoles.en_ZA
dc.titleDoes the spatial sorting of dispersal traits affect the phenotype of the non-dispersing stages of the invasive frog Xenopus laevis through coupling?en_ZA
dc.mdidentification.organizationnameCentre of Excellence for Invasion Biologyen_ZA
dc.mdidentification.deliverypointFaculty of Science, Natural Sciences Building, Private Bag X1, Stellenbosch University, Matielanden_ZA
dc.mdidentification.postalcode7602en_ZA
dc.mdidentification.phone0218082832en_ZA
dc.mdidentification.electronicmailaddresskcd@sun.ac.zaen_ZA
dc.mddataidentification.languageEnglishen_ZA
dc.mdusage.usagedatetime2019
dc.mdlegalconstraints.accessconstraintscopyrighten_ZA
dc.dqcompletenessomission.valueunitPercentageen_ZA
dc.dqcompletenessomission.valueattributedata100en_ZA
dc.mdmaintenanceinformation.maintenanceandupdatefrequencyWhen_neededen_ZA
dc.mdfeaturecataloguedescription.cataloguedate2020-09-28
dc.mddistributor.distributorcontactCentre for Invasion Biologyen_ZA
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.westboundlongitude-1.4275en_ZA
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.eastboundlongitude0.0996en_ZA
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.northboundlattitude47.5077en_ZA
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.southboundlattitude46.7933en_ZA
dc.exverticalextent.minimumvalue135en_ZA
dc.exverticalextent.maximumvalue281en_ZA
dc.exverticalextent.unitofmeasuremetersen_ZA
dc.cibprojectDeterminants of invasion and scenarios of changeen_ZA


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