• Genetic diversity and structure of the globally invasive tree, Paraserianthes lophantha subspecies lophantha, suggest an introduction history characterised by varying propagule pressure 

      Thompson, G.D.; Richardson, D.M.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Bellstedt, D.U.; Le Roux, J.J. (Springer, 2016)
      An emerging insight in invasion biology is that intra-specific genetic variation, human usage, and introduction histories interact to shape genetic diversity and its distribution in populations of invasive species. We ...
    • Geographical and taxonomic biases in invasion ecology 

      Pysek, P.; Richardson, D.M.; Pergl, J.; Jarosık, V.; Sixtova, Z.; Weber, E. (Elsevier Ltd., 2008)
      Invasive alien species come from most taxonomic groups, and invasion biology is searching for robust cross-taxon generalizations and principles. An analysis of 2670 papers dealing with 892 invasive species showed that all ...
    • Ghosts from the past: even comprehensive sampling of the native range may not be enough to unravel the introduction history of invasive species – the case of Acacia dealbata invasions in South Africa 

      Hirsch, H.; Castillo, M.L.; Impson, F.A.C.; Kleinjan, C.; Richardson, D.M.; Le Roux, J.J. (Botanical Society of America, 2019)
      PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Knowledge about the introduction history (source(s), number and size of introduction events) of an invasive species is a crucial prerequisite to understand invasion success and to facilitate effective ...
    • Global actions for managing cactus invasions 

      Novoa, A.; Brundu, G.; Day, M.D.; Deltoro, V.; Essl, F.; Foxcroft, L.C.; Fried, G.; Kaplan, H.; Kumschick, S.; Lloyd, S.; Marchante, E.; Marchante, H.; Paterson, I.D.; Pyšek, P.; Richardson, D.M.; Witt, A.; Zimmermann, H.G.; Wilson, J.R.U. (2019)
      The family Cactaceae Juss. contains some of the most widespread and damaging invasive alien plant species in the world, with Australia (39 species), South Africa (35) and Spain (24) being the main hotspots of invasion. The ...
    • The global distribution of bamboos: assessing correlates of introduction and invasion 

      Canavan, S.; Richardson, D.M.; Visser, V.; Le Roux, J.J.; Voronstsova, M.S.; Wilson, J.R.U. (Oxford University Press, 2017)
      There is a long history of species being moved around the world by humans. These introduced species can provide substantial benefits, but they can also have undesirable consequences. We explore the importance of human ...
    • Global effects of non-native tree species on multiple ecosystem services 

      Castro-Diez, P.; Vaz, A.S.; Silva, J.S.; Loo, M.; Alonso, A.; Aponte, C.; Bayon, A.; Bellingham, P.J.; Chiuffo, M.C.; DiManno, N.; Julian, K.; Kandert, S.; La Porta, N.; Marchante, H.; Maule, H.G.; Mayfield, M.M.; Metcalfe, D.; Monteverdi, M.C.; Nunez, M.A.; Ostertag, R.; Parker, I.M.; Peltzer, D.A.; Potgieter, L.J.; Raymundo, M.; Rayome, D.; Reisman-Berman, O.; Richardson, D.M.; Roos, R.E.; Saldana, A.; Shackleton, R.T.; Torres, A.; Trudgen, M.; Urban, J.; Vicente, J.R.; Vila, M.; Ylioja, T.; Zenni, R.D.; Godoy, O. (2019)
      Non-native tree (NNT) species have been transported worldwide to create or enhance services that are fundamental for human well‐being, such as timber provision, erosion control or ornamental value; yet NNTs can also produce ...
    • Global grass (Poaceae) success underpinned by traits facilitating colonization, persistence and habitat transformation 

      Linder, H.P.; Lehmann, C.E.R.; Archibald, S.; Osborne, C.P.; Richardson, D.M. (Cambridge Philosophical Society, 2018)
      Poaceae (the grasses) is arguably the most successful plant family, in terms of its global occurrence in (almost) all ecosystems with angiosperms, its ecological dominance in many ecosystems, and high species richness. We ...
    • Global networks for invasion science: benefits, challenges and guidelines 

      Packer, J.G.; Meyerson, L.A.; Richardson, D.M.; Brundu, G.; Allen, W.J.; Bhattarai, G.P.; Brix, H.; Canavan, S.; Castiglione, S.; Cicatelli, A.; Čuda, J.; Cronin, J.T.; Eller, F.; Guarino, F.; Guo, W.H.; Guo, W.Y.; Guo, X.; Hierro, J.L.; Lambertini, C.; Liu, J.; Lozano, V.; Mozdzer, T.J.; Skálová, H.; Villarreal, D.; Wang, R.Q.; Pyšek, P. (Springer, 2017)
      Much has been done to address the challenges of biological invasions, but fundamental questions (e.g., which species invade? Which habitats are invaded? How can invasions be effectively managed?) still need to be answered ...
    • Global predictors of alien plant establishment success: combining niche and trait proxies 

      Gallien, L.; Thornhill, A.H.; Zurell, D.; Miller, J.T.; Richardson, D.M. (The Royal Society Publishing, 2019)
      Biological invasions are on the rise globally. To reduce future invasions, it is imperative to determine the naturalization potential of species. Until now, screening approaches have relied largely on species-specific ...
    • Grasses as invasive plants in South Africa revisited: patterns, pathways and management 

      Visser, V.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Canavan, K.; Canavan, S.; Fisher, L.; Le Maitre, D.; Nanni, I.; Mashau, C.; O'Connor, T.G.; Ivey, P.; Kumschick, S.; Richardson, D.M. (AOSIS, 2017)
      Background: In many countries around the world, the most damaging invasive plant species are grasses. However, the status of grass invasions in South Africa has not been documented recently. Objectives: To update Sue ...
    • Guidance for addressing the Australian Weed Risk Assessment questions 

      Gordon, D.A.; Mitterdorfer, B.; Pheloung, P.C.; Ansari, S.; Buddenhagen, C.; Chimera, C.; Daehler, C.C.; Dawson, W.; Denslow, J.S.; LaRosa, A.-M.; Nishida, T.; Onderdonk, D.A.; Panetta, F.D.; Pyšek, P.; Randall, R.P.; Richardson, D.M.; Tshidada, N.J.; Virtue, J.G.; Williams, P.A. (RG and RJ Richardson, 2010)
      This paper provides guidance on how to address the 49 questions of the Australian Weed Risk Assessment (WRA) system. The WRA was developed in Australia in 1999, and has since been widely adapted for different regions. ...
    • Guidelines for improved management of riparian zones invaded by alien plants in South Africa 

      Holmes, P.M.; Esler, K.J.; Richardson, D.M.; Witkowski, E.T.F. (Elsevier B.V., 2008)
      This paper reviews the results of recent research on riparian vegetation recovery following the clearance of invasive alien plants. In Fynbos, Grassland and Savanna Biomes, riparian ecosystems were found to have relatively-high ...
    • Herbivores, but not other insects, are scarce on alien plants 

      Proches, S.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Richardson, D.M.; Chown, S.L. (Ecological Society of Australia, 2008)
      Understanding how the landscape-scale replacement of indigenous plants with alien plants influences ecosystem structure and functioning is critical in a world characterized by increasing biotic homogenization. An important ...
    • Historical legacies accumulate to shape future biodiversity in an era of rapid global change 

      Essl, F.; Dullinger, S.; Rabitsch, W.; Hulme, P.E.; Pysek, P.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Richardson, D.M. (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2015)
      Aim Biodiversity responses to changing environmental forcing on species are often characterized by considerable time-lags (= relaxation times). Although changes to the occurrence and abundance of species likely have cascading ...
    • Historical range contraction, and not taxonomy, explains the contemporary genetic structure of the Australian tree, Acacia dealbata Link 

      Hirsch, H.; Richardson, D.M.; Impson, F.A.C.; Kleinjan, C.; Le Roux, J.J. (Springer, 2018)
      Irrespective of its causes, strong population genetic structure indicates a lack of gene flow. Understanding the processes that underlie such structure, and the spatial patterns it causes, is valuable for conservation ...
    • Hitting the right target: taxonomic challenges for, and of, plant invasions 

      Pysek, P.; Hulme, P.E.; Meyerson, L.A.; Smith, G.F.; Boatwright, J.S.; Crouch, N.R.; Figueiredo, E.; Foxcroft, L.C.; Jarosik, V.; Richardson, D.M.; Suda, J.; Wilson, J.R.U. (Oxford University Press, 2013-09-19)
      This paper explores how a lack of taxonomic expertise, and by implication a dearth of taxonomic products such as identification tools, has hindered progress in understanding and managing biological invasions. It also ...
    • Home away from home - objective mapping of high-risk source areas for plant introductions 

      Richardson, DM; Thuiller, W (BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, 2007-05)
      Prevention is the best way to slow the escalation of problems associated with biological invasions. Screening of potential introductions is widely applied for assessing the risk of species becoming invasive. Despite advances ...
    • Honoring Harold A. Mooney: Citizen of the world and catalyst for invasion science 

      Simberloff, D.; Meyerson, L.A.; Pyšek, P.; Richardson, D.M. (Springer, 2017)
    • How to invade an ecological network 

      Hui, C.; Richardson, D.M. (Elsevier Ltd, 2019)
      Invasion science is in a state of paradox, having low predictability despite strong, identifiable covariates of invasion performance. We propose shifting the foundation metaphor of biological invasions from a linear filtering ...
    • The human and social dimensions of invasion science and management 

      Shackleton, R.T.; Larson, B.M.H.; Novoa, A.; Richardson, D.M.; Kull, C.A. (Elsevier Ltd, 2019)
      Biological invasions are a leading cause of global environmental change given their effects on both humans and biodiversity. Humans introduce invasive alien species and may facilitate their establishment and spread, which ...