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dc.contributor.authorCrous, C.
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, S.J.
dc.contributor.authorEsler, K.J.
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-12T07:31:05Z
dc.date.available2011-12-12T07:31:05Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1020
dc.description.abstractsuccessfully invaded many riparian zones in South Africa, especially Australian Acacia spp. which are prevalent along riverbanks in the south-western Cape of South Africa. This Mediterranean-type climate region is predicted to endure severe future water shortages under likely scenarios of increased population growth and climate change, and IAPs aggravate this problem due to their profligate water use. Acacia mearnsii competes aggressively with native species, however, it remains unclear what physiological advantage the species has over co-occurring native species under the predicted reduced streamflow scenarios. A mechanistic approach was used to investigate how key native fynbos riparian woody tree species compare in vulnerability to drought-induced cavitation against A. mearnsii by comparing findings from three Mediterranean- type fynbos river systems that differ in streamflow. A. mearnsii showed lower water potential at 50% hydraulic conductivity loss (P50 values) compared to native species at certain sites, an indication of drought-tolerance. This suggests it is likely to persist under future drier conditions and it therefore remains a top priority for control. The native Brabejum stellatifolium had consistently higher water potentials across all sites than the other studied species, and is a potentially valuable species for restoration of south-western Cape riparian zones. Consistency in the shapes of species vulnerability curves across sites illustrated a species-specific hydraulic response to different water availability, strengthening the argument that this approach to distinguish site-level drought-tolerance between trees is a practical technique, with great application in understanding future geographic distribution under climate change, and potential for use in restoration research. Additionally, streamflow was an inaccurate predictor of species drought-tolerance along these riparian systems.en
dc.format.extent1937739 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.subjectInvasive alien planten
dc.subjectWater potentialen
dc.subjectCarbon isotopeen
dc.subjectRestorationen
dc.subjectStreamflowen
dc.subjectXylem cavitationen
dc.titleDrought-tolerance of an invasive alien tree, Acacia mearnsii and two native competitors in fynbos riparian ecotonesen
dc.typeJournalArticlesen
dc.cibjournalBiological Invasionsen
dc.cibprojectDeterminants of invasion and scenarios of changeen


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