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dc.contributor.authorvan Wilgen, B.W.
dc.contributor.authorForsyth, G.G.
dc.contributor.authorLe Maitre, D.C.
dc.contributor.authorWannenburgh, A.
dc.contributor.authorKotze, J.D.F.
dc.contributor.authorvan den Berg, E.
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, L.
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-28T08:45:50Z
dc.date.available2013-02-28T08:45:50Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationvan Wilgen, B.W., Forsyth, G.G., Le Maitre, D.C., Wannenburgh, A., Kotze, J.D.F., van den Berg, E. and Henderson, L. (2012). An assessment of the effectiveness of a large, national-scale invasive alien plant control strategy in South Africa. Biological Conservation 148, 28-38en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1244
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents an assessment of a large, national-scale alien plant control program that has operated in South Africa for 15 years. We reviewed data from three national-level estimates of the extent of invasion, records of the costs and spatial extent of invasive species control operations, assessments of the effectiveness of biological control, and smaller-scale studies. The 19 most important invasive taxa, mainly trees, in terrestrial biomes were identified. The effectiveness of control efforts on the extent of invasion of these taxa was assessed. Control costs over 15 years amounted to 3.2 billion rands (US$457 million), more than half of which was spent on 10 taxa, the most prominent being in the genera Acacia, Prosopis, Pinus and Eucalyptus. Despite substantial spending, control operations were in many cases applied to a relatively small portion of the estimated invaded area, and invasions appear to have increased, and remain a serious threat, in many biomes. Our findings suggest that South Africa’s national-scale strategy to clear invasive alien plants should be substantially modified if impacts are to be effectively mitigated. Rather than attempting to control all species, and to operate in all areas, a more focused approach is called for. This would include prioritising both the species and the areas, and setting goals and monitoring the degree to which they are achieved, within a framework of adaptive management. A greater portion of funding should also be directed towards biological control, where successes have been most notable.en
dc.format.extent204729 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectAdaptive managementen
dc.subjectBiological controlen
dc.subjectBiological invasionsen
dc.subjectEcosystem servicesen
dc.subjectInvasive alien speciesen
dc.subjectWorking for Wateren
dc.titleAn assessment of the effectiveness of a large, national-scale invasive alien plant control strategy in South Africaen
dc.typeJournalArticlesen
dc.cibjournalBiological Conservationen
dc.cibprojectNAen


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