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dc.contributor.authorHui, C.
dc.contributor.authorFoxcroft, L.C.
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, D.M.
dc.contributor.authorMacFayden, S.
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-12T06:09:52Z
dc.date.available2014-02-12T06:09:52Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationHui, C., Foxcroft, L.C., Richardson, D.M. & MacFadyen, S. (2013) A cross-scale approach for abundance estimation of invasive alien plants in a large protected area. In: L.C. Foxcroft, D.M. Richardson, P. Pysek & Genovesi. eds. Plant Invasions in Protected Areas: Patterns, Problems and Challenges, pp. 73-88. Springer, Berlin. ISBN: 978-94-007-7750-7.en
dc.identifier.issnISBN: 978-94-007-7750-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1376
dc.description.abstractEfficient management of invasive alien plants requires robust and cost-efficient methods for measuring the abundance and spatial structure of inva- sive alien plants with sufficient accuracy. Here, we present such a monitoring method using ad hoc presence-absence records that are routinely collected for various management and research needs in Kruger National Park, South Africa. The total and local abundance of all invasive alien plants were estimated using the area-of-occupancy model that depicts a power-law scaling pattern of species occupancy across scales and a detection-rate-based Poisson model that allows us to estimate abundance from the occupancy, respectively. Results from these two models were consistent in predicting a total of about one million invasive alien plant records for the park. The accuracy of log-transformed abundance estimate improved significantly with the increase of sampling effort. However, estimating abundance was shown to be much more difficult than detecting the spatial structure of the invasive alien plants. Since management of invasive species in protected areas is often hampered by limited resources for detailed surveys and monitoring, relatively simple and inexpensive monitoring strategies are important. Such data should also be appropriate for multiple purposes. We therefore recommend the use of the scaling pattern of species distribution as a method for rapid and robust monitoring of invasive alien plants in protected areas. Not only do these approaches provide valuable tools for managers and biologists in protected areas, but this kind of data, which can be collected as part of routine activities for a protected area, provides excellent opportunities for researchers to explore the status of aliens as well as their assemblage patterns and functions.en
dc.format.extent320511 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectInvasive plantsen
dc.subjectKruger National Parken
dc.subjectOpuntia strictaen
dc.subjectLantana camaraen
dc.subjectOptimum monitoring strategyen
dc.titleA cross-scale approach for abundance estimation of invasive alien plants in a large protected areaen
dc.typeBookChaptersen
dc.cibjournalPlant Invasions in Protected Areas: Patterns, Problems and Challengesen
dc.cibprojectLarge-scale patterns in diversityen


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