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dc.contributor.authorZylstra, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-01T11:13:59Z
dc.date.available2014-04-01T11:13:59Z
dc.date.created2014en
dc.date.issued2014-04-01T11:13:59Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1393
dc.descriptionThe qualitative and quantitative dataset encompasses results from online surveys, street-based public surveys, in-depth interviews and participant observation methods which all addressed (to varying degrees) key research themes of: meaningful nature experience, connectedness with nature,(perception and experience of) invasive alien species and the collective implications for education for sustainability.en
dc.description.abstractThis study brings together four core themes: connectedness with nature (CWN), invasive alien species (IAS), and education for sustainability (EfS); each of which are explored around - and in relationship to - the core concept of meaningful nature experience (MNE). Using qualitative and quantitative (mixed) methods, the study found that MNE is commonly associated CWN and can be a catalyst, motivation and predictor for environmentally responsible behaviour. MNEs were also considered highly influential in shaping respondents life outlook. Respondents who have had a MNE exhibit a higher CWN; a positive correlation exists between frequency of MNE (fMNE) and CWN. The presence of IAS in a landscape is likely to adversely affect MNE for stated reasons of ecological impacts, diminished 'naturalness' , destructiveness and reduced diversity. Those viewing IAS as potentially enhancing their MNEs cite reasons of beauty, novelty and enjoyment. Respondents CWN does not appear to affect perceptions of IAS; however, elevated CWN may invoke empathy, a sense of relatedness and appreciation of their intrinsic value as 'life'. IAS may also feature in MNEs and, through experiential and metaphorical insight, can deliver newfound understandings of social and ecological connections as they relate to IAS. Overall research outcomes support an educational revitalization that incorporates appreciations of MNE, CWN and their potentials to cultivate an ecological consciousness.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityEsler, Karen
dc.format.extent14043480 bytes
dc.format.extent1294666 bytes
dc.format.extent102303 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/vnd.ms-excel
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightscopyrighten
dc.subjectNature Experiencesen
dc.subjectPerceptionsen
dc.subjectSurveys (Likert-scale)en
dc.subjectInterview Transcriptsen
dc.subjectPhenomenological Descriptionsen
dc.subjectMixed Methodsen
dc.titleExploring meaningful nature experience, connectedness with nature and the revitalization of transformative education for sustainabilityen
dc.mdidentification.purposeHumanity's growing separation from nature is central to the social-ecological crises facing earth. The prime purpose of this transdisciplinary research was to therefore explore the potential for meaningful nature experience (MNE) to mitigate modern society's fading connectedness with nature(CWN). In assessing the potential impacts of loss of biodiversity on human experience, the study was also purposed to identify the ways that invasive alien species(IAS) may affect current and future MNE. The research additionally considered how an individual's CWN may affect perceptions toward IAS. The overall intent of this research was to determine how insights from the above may enhance conservation and sustainability education.en
dc.mdidentification.organizationnameStellenbosch Universityen
dc.mdidentification.deliverypointDept. of Conservation Ecology & Entomology Stellenbosch University Private Bag X1 Matieland South Africaen
dc.mdidentification.postalcode7602en
dc.mdidentification.phone+27 21 808 4005en
dc.mdidentification.electronicmailaddresskje@sun.ac.zaen
dc.mddataidentification.languageEnglishen
dc.mdusage.specificusageIdentifying types of meaningful nature experiences and perception of influential variablesen
dc.mdusage.userdeterminedlimitationsNoneen
dc.mdusage.usagedatetime2010-09-01
dc.mdlegalconstraints.accessconstraintscopyrighten
dc.mdlegalconstraints.otherconstraintsAll respondents' names/alias and submitted email addresses should remain strictly confidential unless prior permission is obtained.en
dc.lilineage.statementData derived from: 1. a series of online surveys (questionnaires); and 2. a public/street-based survey (an abbreviated version of the online survey) administered in selected urban areas in South Africa.en
dc.dqcompletenessomission.valueunitPercentageen
dc.dqcompletenessomission.valueattributedata100en
dc.mdmaintenanceinformation.maintenanceandupdatefrequencyWhen_neededen
dc.mdfeaturecataloguedescription.cataloguedate2014-04-24
dc.mddistributor.distributorcontactCentre for Invasion Biologyen
dc.mdformat.namePDF and MS Excelen
dc.mdformat.version2014en
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.westboundlongitudeNAen
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.eastboundlongitudeNAen
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.northboundlattitudeNAen
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.southboundlattitudeNAen
dc.exverticalextent.minimumvalueNAen
dc.exverticalextent.maximumvalueNAen
dc.exverticalextent.unitofmeasuremetersen
dc.cibprojectSocial perceptions and impacts of invasionen


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