Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorle Roux, P.C.
dc.contributor.authorRamaswiela, T.
dc.contributor.authorKalwij, J.M.
dc.contributor.authorShaw, J.D.
dc.contributor.authorRyan, P.G.
dc.contributor.authorTreasure, A.M.
dc.contributor.authorMcClelland, G.T.W.
dc.contributor.authorMcGeoch, M.A.
dc.contributor.authorChown, S.L.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-04T07:14:27Z
dc.date.available2014-06-04T07:14:27Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationle Roux, P.C., Ramaswiela, T., Kalwij, J.M., Shaw, J.D., Ryan, P.G., Treasure, A.M., McClelland, G.T.W., McGeoch, M.A. and Chown, S.L. (2013). Human activities, propagule pressure and alien plants in the sub-Antarctic: tests of generalities and evidence in support of management. Biological Conservation 161, 18-27.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1434
dc.description.abstractDespite concerns about the richness of plant invaders on islands, and their likely effects on local systems, impacts of these species seem to be small. However, this may be due to an absence of information on impacts, including changing species occupancy and forecast occupancy, rather than lack of impact per se. Here we use the plant invaders on the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands (PEIs) and spatially explicit modeling of presence–absence survey data to demonstrate that the geographic extent of many invasives is increasing and is forecast to lead to occupancy of >60% of the islands’ surface area by 2060, with ongoing climate change. In keeping with theory, proximity to human activity, neighboring populations (i.e. propagule pressure) and residence time, along with more minor contributors such as elevation, explain >50% of the variation in the occupancy of each of the six main invasive species on the islands. Human disturbance and changing climates seem to have led to recent increases in the rate of range expansion. Our results suggest that impacts of island plant invaders may be more significant than previously estimated, largely owing to prior data deficiency. More specifically they also suggest that control plans for the PEI (and other Southern Ocean Islands, SOIS) should first target less widely distributed species, which are invasive elsewhere. They also indicate that for the other SOIS, and for Antarctica, surveillance and anticipatory control plans should be in place.en
dc.format.extent1416316 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd.en
dc.subjectAntarcticen
dc.subjectEnvironmental changeen
dc.subjectInvasive alien speciesen
dc.subjectPropagule pressureen
dc.subjectResidence timeen
dc.titleHuman activities, propagule pressure and alien plants in the sub-Antarctic: Tests of generalities and evidence in support of managementen
dc.typeJournalArticlesen
dc.cibjournalBiological Conservationen
dc.cibprojectNAen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record