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dc.contributor.authorBarrow, Stuart Bruce
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-10T09:46:40Z
dc.date.available2015-02-10T09:46:40Z
dc.date.created2014en
dc.date.issued2015-02-10T09:46:40Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1639
dc.description.abstractThe number of introductions of alien species is on the rise globally. The resulting impacts on the invaded environments are diverse and often contrasting. Many deliberately introduced species have positive social and economic impacts as people use them to achieve a goal. These goals can be recreational, such as mountain biking in a plantation of alien trees or commercial such as harvesting alien trees for timber. Conflict often arises when the goals of the individuals using the alien species clash with the goals of those trying to mitigate negative impacts of the introductions. As many scientists are more inclined to favour native over alien species, the negative impacts of alien species are better documented in scientific literature. It is valuable to document contrasting impacts of alien species so that they may be managed in a way which does not cause unnecessary conflict. This thesis documents contrasting impacts of Micropterus dolomieu (smallmouth bass) within the Cape Floristic Region (CFR). It does this using the Rondegat River in the Olifants-Doring River system and the Clanwilliam Dam, in the same system, as case studies. Smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu, were removed from the Rondegat River using a piscicide called rotenone by the Western Cape nature conservation authorities; CapeNature. This thesis documents the results of snorkel observations and underwater filming of the river. Native fish densities increased from 0.29 fish/100m2 to 11.81 fish/100m2 following smallmouth bass removal. Documenting the recovery of the native fish population following smallmouth bass removal provides further insight into the negative ecological impacts of the species. The results of the monitoring show that smallmouth bass had extirpated three native species from the invaded reaches and was preying heavily upon juveniles that were dispersing downstream. The removal of the smallmouth bass from the Rondegat River was a project which cost CapeNature both money and time. Through personal communication with implementers of the project and through access to CapeNature financial records, this thesis documents the costs of the Rondegat River smallmouth bass eradication project. It cost CapeNature R 358 068 per kilometre of river to eradicate smallmouth bass from the Rondegat. An estimated 5079 man hours were spent on the final planning and implementing of the two rotenone treatments. These costs represent a negative economic impact of smallmouth bass and are useful in estimating the costs of future eradication projects. These two negative impacts are contrasted with the positive socio-economic impacts of the species. The Clanwilliam Dam, further downstream, hosts a large smallmouth bass population and is considered to be one of South Africa’s premier smallmouth bass fishing destinations. Anglers who travel to the dam in order to catch smallmouth bass often spend money at local businesses, thus contributing to the local economy. This expenditure is a positive economic impact of smallmouth bass. Anglers were interviewed at the dam and it was estimated that they spend R2 000 721.61 in the town of Clanwilliam every year. This is taken as the economic impact of smallmouth bass angling upon the town. This expenditure has a positive impact on local businesses and their employees. Smallmouth bass therefore, have contrasting impacts within the CFR and it is important that they are all considered in the management of the species. The Rondegat River smallmouth bass eradication project is an example of how the negative impacts of smallmouth bass can be mitigated without affecting its positive impacts and is a case study that could potentially inform how management of the genus proceeds in South Africa.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityWeyl, Olaf LF
dc.format.extent2813203 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightscopyrighten
dc.subjectAlien speciesen
dc.subjectinvasionen
dc.subjectimpactsen
dc.subjecteconomic impacten
dc.subjectconflicten
dc.subjectrotenoneen
dc.titleContrasting impact of alien invasive sport fish in the Cape Floristic Region: a focus on Micropterus dolomieuen
dc.mdidentification.purposeMSc thesisen
dc.mdidentification.organizationnameCentre of Excellence for Invasion Biologyen
dc.mdidentification.deliverypointFaculty of Science, Natural Sciences Building, Private Bag X1, Stellenbosch University, Matielanden
dc.mdidentification.postalcode7602en
dc.mdidentification.phone0218082832en
dc.mdidentification.electronicmailaddresskcd@sun.ac.zaen
dc.mddataidentification.languageEnglishen
dc.mdusage.usagedatetime2014-11-19
dc.mdlegalconstraints.accessconstraintscopyrighten
dc.lilineage.statementSubmitted in fulfillment of MSc degreeen
dc.dqcompletenessomission.valueunitPercentageen
dc.dqcompletenessomission.valueattributedata100en
dc.mdmaintenanceinformation.maintenanceandupdatefrequencyWhen_neededen
dc.mdfeaturecataloguedescription.cataloguedate2014-01-22
dc.mddistributor.distributorcontactUniversity of Stellenboschen
dc.mdformat.namePDFen
dc.mdformat.version2014en
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.westboundlongitude-18.889263°en
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.eastboundlongitude18.889263°en
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.northboundlattitude-32.213748°en
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.southboundlattitude-32.213748°en
dc.exverticalextent.minimumvalue711en
dc.exverticalextent.maximumvalue1000en
dc.exverticalextent.unitofmeasuremetersen
dc.cibprojectImpacts of invasionen


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