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dc.contributor.authorWeyl, O.L.F.
dc.contributor.authorEllender, B.R.
dc.contributor.authorWasserman, R.J.
dc.contributor.authorWoodford, D.J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-14T07:57:48Z
dc.date.available2015-08-14T07:57:48Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationWeyl, O.L.F.; Ellender, B.R.; Wasserman, R.J.; Woodford, D.J. (2015) Unintended consequences of using alien fish for human benefit in protected areas. Koedoe, 57(1), Art. #1264en
dc.identifier.issn0075-6458
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1736
dc.description.abstractThere is increasing pressure on conservation agencies to allow access to natural resources within protected areas for human benefit. Alien fishes are often seen as a convenient resource because their harvest does not conflict with conservation goals. However, allowing such access may have unintended consequences for managers. This opinion essay is intended to provide some insights into how promoting access to alien fish resources can add to the complexity of conservation interventions, may facilitate additional fish introductions and create dependencies on alien fish that could compromise potential eradication efforts. Conservation implications: Management plans for the utilisation of alien fishes by external stakeholders must include clear exit strategies so that the ability to eradicate when necessary or feasible is not compromised.en
dc.format.extent5787061 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAOSIS (Pty) Ltd.en
dc.titleUnintended consequences of using alien fish for human benefit in protected areasen
dc.typeArticleen


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