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dc.contributor.authorZapata, FA
dc.contributor.authorGaston, KJ
dc.contributor.authorChown, SL
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-16T10:53:37Z
dc.date.available2007-04-16T10:53:37Z
dc.date.issued2005-11
dc.identifier.issn0003-0147en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/206
dc.description.abstractWe revisit the proposition that boundary constraints on species' ranges cause species richness gradients ( the mid-domain effect [MDE] hypothesis). In the absence of environmental gradients, species should not retain their observed range sizes as assumed by MDE models. Debate remains regarding the definition of domain limits, valid predictions for testing the models, and their statistical assessment. Empirical support for the MDE is varied but often weak, suggesting that geometric constraints on species' ranges do not provide a general explanation for richness gradients. Criticism of MDE model assumptions does not, however, imply opposition to the use of null models in ecology.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSpatial Physiol & Conservat Ecol Grpen
dc.format.extent63188 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUNIV CHICAGO PRESSen
dc.subjectdiversityen
dc.subjectgeographic rangeen
dc.subjectgeometric constraintsen
dc.subjectspatial variationen
dc.subjectspecies richnessen
dc.titleThe mid-domain effect revisiteden
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.cibjournalAMERICAN NATURALISTen
dc.cibprojectNAen


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