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dc.contributor.authorSchmid, B.
dc.contributor.authorNottebrock, H.
dc.contributor.authorEsler, K.J.
dc.contributor.authorPagel, J.
dc.contributor.authorBohning-Gaese, K.
dc.contributor.authorSchurr, F.M.
dc.contributor.authorMueller, T.
dc.contributor.authorSchleuning, M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-07T08:42:27Z
dc.date.available2016-12-07T08:42:27Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationSchmid, B.; Nottebrock, H.; Esler, K.J.; Pagel, J.; Bohning-Gaese, K.; Schurr, F.M.; Mueller, T.; Schleuning, M. (2016) A bird pollinator shows positive frequency dependence and constancy of species choice in natural plant communities. Ecology, 97(11): 3110-3118en
dc.identifier.issn0012-9658en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2132
dc.description.abstractAnimal pollinators mediate reproduction of many plant species. Foraging theory suggests that animal pollinators exhibit preferences for common plant species in natural communities (positive frequency-dependent foraging) and temporary single-species specialization (flower constancy) during foraging bouts. Positive frequency dependence may favor common plant species; flower constancy may enhance conspecific pollen transfer particularly in rare plant species. Previous experimental studies suggest that avian pollinators are unlikely to exhibit these behaviors. We studied foraging behavior of Cape Sugarbirds (Promerops cafer), the main avian pollinator of many Protea species, using focal-plant and focal-bird sampling, assisted by high-resolution maps of the spatiotemporal distribution of Protea individuals and their flowering status. We found that Sugarbird’s visitation preference increased with species’ relative floral abundance, and that individual Sugarbirds tended to visit single species in sequence. Flower constancy during foraging bouts was significantly higher than expected from random plant–animal encounters at the scale of pollinator movements. Positive frequency dependence may favor the reproduction of abundant plant species while flower constancy may be particularly important for rare plant species. This first simultaneous study of both behaviors in a natural plant–pollinator system shows that bird pollinators exhibit both types of behavior and, in this way, possibly influence plant community structure.en
dc.format.extent512571 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEcological Society of Americaen
dc.subjectanimal movementen
dc.subjectCape Floristic Regionen
dc.subjectCape Sugarbirden
dc.subjectflower constancyen
dc.subjectforaging preferenceen
dc.subjectfrequency-dependent foragingen
dc.subjectpollinationen
dc.subjectProteaceaeen
dc.subjectstep selection functionsen
dc.titleA bird pollinator shows positive frequency dependence and constancy of species choice in natural plant communitiesen
dc.typeJournalArticlesen
dc.cibjournalEcologyen
dc.cibprojectNAen


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