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dc.contributor.authorMaoela, M.A.
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, S.M.
dc.contributor.authorRoets, F.
dc.contributor.authorEsler, K.J.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-24T10:07:44Z
dc.date.available2017-01-24T10:07:44Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationMaoela, M.A.; Jacobs, S.M.; Roets, F.; Esler, K.J. (2016) Invasion, alien control and restoration: Legacy effects linked to folivorous insects and phylopathogenic fungi. Austral Ecology, 41(8): 906-917en
dc.identifier.issn1442-9985en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2134
dc.description.abstractInvasive alien trees increase native tree stress and may increase attack by herbivores and pathogenic fungi. Alien tree removal should ameliorate such impacts. Here we compared the levels of damage by phylopathogenic fungi and folivorous insects on Brabejum stellatifolium and Metrosideros angustifolia (native trees) and Acacia mearnsii (invasive tree species) among near-pristine, invaded and restored sites. Generally, foliar damage levels were higher at invaded than at near-pristine sites. Damage levels at restored sites were similar, or even higher than those at invaded sites. Decreased native tree species richness did not explain these patterns, as restored sites had native tree species richness levels similar to those of near-pristine sites. Increased host abundance and leaf nitrogen content did not significantly correlate with increased damage in most cases. Therefore, plant species richness recovers following restoration, but native trees still experience increased pressure from folivores and phylopathogenic fungi, which may even exceed levels experienced at invaded sites, thus impacting recovery trajectories.en
dc.format.extent4310401 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEcological Society of Australiaen
dc.subjectAcacia mearnsiien
dc.subjectfynbosen
dc.subjectleaf damageen
dc.subjectleaf nutrienten
dc.subjectpathogenen
dc.subjectriparian systemen
dc.titleInvasion, alien control and restoration: Legacy effects linked to folivorous insects and phylopathogenic fungien
dc.typeJournalArticlesen
dc.cibjournalAustral Ecologyen
dc.cibprojectNAen


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