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dc.contributor.authorShackleton, R.T.
dc.contributor.authorBertzky, B.
dc.contributor.authorWood, L.E.
dc.contributor.authorBunbury, N.
dc.contributor.authorJäger, H.
dc.contributor.authorvan Merm, R.
dc.contributor.authorSevilla, C.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, K.
dc.contributor.authorWilson, J.R.U.
dc.contributor.authorWitt, A.B.R.
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, D.M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-02T13:22:24Z
dc.date.available2020-10-02T13:22:24Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationShackleton, R.T., Bertzky, B., Wood, L.E., Bunbury, N., Jäger, H., van Merm, R., Sevilla, C., Smith, K., Wilson, J.R.U., Witt, A.B.R. and Richardson, D.M. (2020). Biological invasions in World Heritage Sites: current status and a proposed monitoring and reporting framework. Biodiversity and Conservation 29, 3327-3347.en_ZA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2886
dc.description.abstractUNESCO World Heritage Sites (WHS) are areas of outstanding universal value and conservation importance. They are, however, threatened by a variety of global change drivers, including biological invasions. We assessed the current status of biological invasions and their management in 241 natural and mixed WHS globally by reviewing documents collated by UNESCO and IUCN. We found that reports on the status of biological invasions in WHS were often irregular or inconsistent. Therefore, while some reports were very informative, they were hard to compare because no systematic method of reporting was followed. Our review revealed that almost 300 different invasive alien species (IAS) were considered as a threat to just over half of all WHS. Information on IAS management undertaken in WHS was available for fewer than half of the sites that listed IAS as a threat. There is clearly a need for an improved monitoring and reporting system for biological invasions in WHS and likely the same for other protected areas globally. To address this issue, we developed a new framework to guide monitoring and reporting of IAS in protected areas building on globally accepted standards for IAS assessments, and tested it on seven WHS. The framework requires the collation of information and reporting on pathways, alien species presence, impacts, and management, the estimation of future threats and management needs, assessments of knowledge and gaps, and, using all of this information allows for an overall threat score to be assigned to the protected area. This new framework should help to improve monitoring of IAS in protected areas moving forward.en_ZA
dc.language.isoenen_ZA
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_ZA
dc.subjectConservationen_ZA
dc.subjectGlobal environmental changeen_ZA
dc.subjectInvasive alien speciesen_ZA
dc.subjectIUCNen_ZA
dc.subjectManagementen_ZA
dc.subjectProtected areasen_ZA
dc.subjectUNESCOen_ZA
dc.titleBiological invasions in World Heritage Sites: current status and a proposed monitoring and reporting frameworken_ZA
dc.typeJournalArticlesen_ZA
dc.cibjournalBiodiversity and Conservationen_ZA
dc.cibprojectNAen_ZA


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