Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEsler, KJ
dc.contributor.authorMilton, SJ
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-20T11:21:40Z
dc.date.available2007-06-20T11:21:40Z
dc.date.issued2007-04
dc.identifier.issn0254-6299en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/298
dc.description.abstractNational and Provincial road verges are managed to promote road safety and conserve biodiversity. In most cases the management is carried out by contractors and funded by the Extended Public Works Programme. In some cases, over zealous management or poor training appears to be damaging roadside vegetation and promoting weeds without necessarily improving road safety. Similarly, the clearing of vegetation below power lines can cause damage to vegetation or soil or result in introduction and establishment of invasive alien plant species. A related issue is the clearing of invasive alien plants from river corridors to conserve indigenous vegetation and improve river flow and water yield. However, depending on the density and nature of the alien vegetation and the clearing method, such management sometimes results in erosion that defeats the clearing objectives. The roads and rivers workshop in June 2006 brought together road safety managers, conservation managers and other interested parties to develop "best practice" guidelines acceptable to all parties.en
dc.description.sponsorshipC.I.Ben
dc.format.extent72894 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.subjectBiodiversity Managementen
dc.subjectInvasionen
dc.subjectBest practiceen
dc.titleManaging roads, rivers and powerline servitudes as biodiversity corridors through the landscapeen
dc.typePublished Conference Proceedingsen
dc.cibjournalSouth African Journal of Botanyen
dc.cibprojectRoadsides as reserves and bridgeheadsen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record