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dc.contributor.authorMidoko Iponga, Donald
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, David M.
dc.contributor.authorMilton, Suzanne J.
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-29T08:06:47Z
dc.date.available2009-05-29T08:06:47Z
dc.date.created2006en
dc.date.issued2009-05-29T08:06:47Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/379
dc.description.abstractThe study involved a field manipulation experiment over 14 months using a factorial block design to examine transplanted seedlings in different savanna environments. The experiments examine the effects of soil type (sandy and clay), microsite, and herbivores on seedling performance (establishment,growth and survival). Seedlings were grown in a greenhouse and individually transplanted into four treatment groups: in open grassland, under tree canopies, and with and without cages to exclude large herbivores (cattle and game). The same experiment was repeated in two different soil types: coarse sand and fine-textured clay soil.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityMidoko Iponga, Donald
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityRichardson, David M
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityMilton, Suzanne J
dc.format.extent327168 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/vnd.ms-excel
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsintellectualPropertyRightsen
dc.subjectBotanyen
dc.titleSoil type, microsite, and herbivory influence S.molle growthen
dc.mdidentification.purposeThis study specifically investigates the ways in which the following factors, individually and in concert, potentially influence establishment,growth and survival of S. molle seedlings in semi-arid savanna: soil type; facilitation by large Acacia tree canopies; and herbivory by large mammals. We then consider the implications of those patterns for the prediction of the invasion potential of this species in semi-arid savanna of South Africa.en
dc.mdidentification.organizationnameCentre of Excellence for Invasion Biologyen
dc.mdidentification.deliverypointFaculty of Science, Natural Sciences Building, Private Bag X1, Stellenbosch University, Matielanden
dc.mdidentification.postalcode7602en
dc.mdidentification.phone0218083408en
dc.mdidentification.electronicmailaddresskcd@sun.ac.zaen
dc.mddataidentification.languageEnglishen
dc.mdusage.usagedatetime2008-01-20
dc.mdlegalconstraints.accessconstraintsintellectualPropertyRightsen
dc.lilineage.statementSeedlings of S. molle were germinated in a greenhouse at Stellenbosch University. Geminated seedlings were transplanted into 1,000 ml plastic bags and maintained at ambient temperatures with daily watering until they reached a height 10–15 cm. Two hundred of these seedlings were then transported to Kimberley in March 2006 for use in transplanting experiments. A total of 120 S. molle seedlings were transplanted to the savanna, 60 on sandy soil, and 60 on fine soil. Within each of the soil types, a factorial bock design was used to examine effects of microsite and herbivory on seedling performance. Ten spreading Acacia erioloba trees were selected as host plants on Kalahari sand and 10 Acacia tortilis trees were selected as hosts on finetextured soil. Beneath each of these host trees, three S. molle seedlings were planted (approximately 2 m to the south, east and west of the host tree trunk). Plantings of three S. molle seedlings were made in open grassland beyond the canopies of each of the 20 host trees. Individual cages were placed around 60 seedlings to protect them from large browsing herbivores (15 each in open and subcanopy sites on sand and fine-textured soil).en
dc.dqcompletenessomission.valueunitPercentageen
dc.dqcompletenessomission.valueattributedata100en
dc.mdmaintenanceinformation.maintenanceandupdatefrequencyUnknownen
dc.mdfeaturecataloguedescription.cataloguedate2006-01-20
dc.mddistributor.distributorcontactUniversity of Stellenbosch - CIBen
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.westboundlongitude24.83027729en
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.eastboundlongitude24.85000092en
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.northboundlattitude-28.82150170en
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.southboundlattitude-28.87190728en
dc.exverticalextent.minimumvalue1198 m.a.s.len
dc.exverticalextent.maximumvalue1198 m.a.s.len
dc.exverticalextent.unitofmeasuremetersen
dc.cibprojectInteractions between indigenous and invasive speciesen


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