Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBelton, Lydia
dc.contributor.authorDalerum, Fredrik
dc.contributor.authorvan Rensburg, Berndt
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-17T06:38:54Z
dc.date.available2009-06-17T06:38:54Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationBelton, L, Dalerum, F and van Rensburg B. 2009. Factors associated with suni distribution in Tembe Elephant Park, South Africa: implications for management and conservation of a small antelope. African Journal of Ecology 46, 631-636.en
dc.identifier.issn1365-2028en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/381
dc.description.abstractWhile small antelopes are becoming increasingly threatened, knowledge of their biology is often limited. Management recommendations are therefore frequently based on insufficient information. One declining small antelope is the suni in South Africa. A reduction in sand forest as well as habitat destruction by increased nyala populations are the suggested causes of suni declines. However, no recent study has quantified the factors that underlie suni distribution in southern Africa. Here we investigate whether the vegetation types, vegetation structure or occurrences of sympatric browsers affect suni distribution within Tembe Elephant Park, South Africa. We found that vegetation type and vegetation structure interacted in their effects on suni distribution, but there were no effects of sympatric browsers. Suni were found most often in sand forest, but were also present in closed woodland. Vegetation structure was, however, related to the local distribution of suni only in sand forest. This highlights that suni are not exclusively bound to sand forest, and also that vegetation structure within the sand forest may be as important as the vegetation type. We suggest that the current conservation assessment of this subspecies is based on insufficient data, and that a more detailed assessment of their distribution and the factors that determine the same is critically needed.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to thank Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife for financial support with a special thanks to Nick de Goede and Wayne Matthews from Tembe Elephant Park for logistical assistance during all stages of the field work. Sabelo Mthembu, Megan Rast and Amos Tembe assisted with the collection of data. BJVR acknowledge financial support from the DST-NRF Centre for Invasion Biology and the University of Pretoria.en
dc.format.extent166872 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing LtDen
dc.subjectConservation managementen
dc.subjectNeotragus moschatus zuluensisen
dc.subjectsunien
dc.subjectsmall antelopeen
dc.titleFactors associated with suni distribution in Tembe Elephant Park, South Africa: implications for management and conservation of a small antelopeen
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.cibjournalAfrican Journal of Ecologyen
dc.cibprojectLarge-scale patterns in diversityen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record