• Genetic diversity and structure of the globally invasive tree, Paraserianthes lophantha subspecies lophantha, suggest an introduction history characterised by varying propagule pressure 

      Thompson, G.D.; Richardson, D.M.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Bellstedt, D.U.; Le Roux, J.J. (Springer, 2016)
      An emerging insight in invasion biology is that intra-specific genetic variation, human usage, and introduction histories interact to shape genetic diversity and its distribution in populations of invasive species. We ...
    • Global actions for managing cactus invasions 

      Novoa, A.; Brundu, G.; Day, M.D.; Deltoro, V.; Essl, F.; Foxcroft, L.C.; Fried, G.; Kaplan, H.; Kumschick, S.; Lloyd, S.; Marchante, E.; Marchante, H.; Paterson, I.D.; Pyšek, P.; Richardson, D.M.; Witt, A.; Zimmermann, H.G.; Wilson, J.R.U. (2019)
      The family Cactaceae Juss. contains some of the most widespread and damaging invasive alien plant species in the world, with Australia (39 species), South Africa (35) and Spain (24) being the main hotspots of invasion. The ...
    • A global assessment of a large monocot family highlights the need for group-specific analyses of invasiveness 

      Moodley, D.; Procheş, Ş.; Wilson, J.R.U. (Oxford University Press, 2016)
      Significant progress has been made in understanding biological invasions recently, and one of the key findings is that the determinants of naturalization and invasion success vary from group to group. Here, we explore this ...
    • The global distribution of bamboos: assessing correlates of introduction and invasion 

      Canavan, S.; Richardson, D.M.; Visser, V.; Le Roux, J.J.; Voronstsova, M.S.; Wilson, J.R.U. (Oxford University Press, 2017)
      There is a long history of species being moved around the world by humans. These introduced species can provide substantial benefits, but they can also have undesirable consequences. We explore the importance of human ...
    • Global environmental and socio-economic impacts of selected alien grasses as a basis for ranking threats to South Africa 

      Nkuna, K.V.; Visser, V.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Kumschick, S. (Creative Commons CC-BY 4.0, 2018)
      Decisions to allocate management resources should be underpinned by estimates of the impacts of biological invasions that are comparable across species and locations. For the same reason, it is important to assess what ...
    • Global guidelines for the sustainable use of non-native trees to prevent tree invasions and mitigate their negative impacts 

      Brundu, G.; Pauchard, A.; Pyšek, P.; Pergl, J.; Bindewald, A.M.; Brunori, A.; Canavan, S.; Campagnaro, T.; Celesti-Grapow, L.; de Sá Dechoum, M.; Dufour-Dror, J.-M.; Essl, F.; Flory, S.L.; Genovesi, P.; Guarino, F.; Guangzhe, L.; Hulme, P.E.; Jäger, H.; Kettle, C.J.; Krumm, F.; Langdon, B.; Lapin, K.; Lozano, V.; Le Roux, J.J.; Novoa, A.; Nuñez, M.A.; Porté, A.J.; Silva, J.S.; Schaffner, U.; Sitzia, T.; Tanner, R.; Tshidada, N.; Vítková, M.; Westergren, M.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Richardson, D.M. (2020)
      Sustainably managed non-native trees deliver economic and societal benefits with limited risk of spread to adjoining areas. However, some plantations have launched invasions that cause substantial damage to biodiversity ...
    • Grasses as invasive plants in South Africa revisited: patterns, pathways and management 

      Visser, V.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Canavan, K.; Canavan, S.; Fisher, L.; Le Maitre, D.; Nanni, I.; Mashau, C.; O'Connor, T.G.; Ivey, P.; Kumschick, S.; Richardson, D.M. (AOSIS, 2017)
      Background: In many countries around the world, the most damaging invasive plant species are grasses. However, the status of grass invasions in South Africa has not been documented recently. Objectives: To update Sue ...
    • Herbivores, but not other insects, are scarce on alien plants 

      Proches, S.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Richardson, D.M.; Chown, S.L. (Ecological Society of Australia, 2008)
      Understanding how the landscape-scale replacement of indigenous plants with alien plants influences ecosystem structure and functioning is critical in a world characterized by increasing biotic homogenization. An important ...
    • Historical legacies accumulate to shape future biodiversity in an era of rapid global change 

      Essl, F.; Dullinger, S.; Rabitsch, W.; Hulme, P.E.; Pysek, P.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Richardson, D.M. (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2015)
      Aim Biodiversity responses to changing environmental forcing on species are often characterized by considerable time-lags (= relaxation times). Although changes to the occurrence and abundance of species likely have cascading ...
    • Hitting the right target: taxonomic challenges for, and of, plant invasions 

      Pysek, P.; Hulme, P.E.; Meyerson, L.A.; Smith, G.F.; Boatwright, J.S.; Crouch, N.R.; Figueiredo, E.; Foxcroft, L.C.; Jarosik, V.; Richardson, D.M.; Suda, J.; Wilson, J.R.U. (Oxford University Press, 2013-09-19)
      This paper explores how a lack of taxonomic expertise, and by implication a dearth of taxonomic products such as identification tools, has hindered progress in understanding and managing biological invasions. It also ...
    • How do invasive species travel to and through urban environments? 

      Padayachee, A.L.; Irlich, U.M.; Faulkner, K.T.; Gaertner, M.; Proches, S.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Rouget, M. (Springer, 2017)
      Globalisation has resulted in the movement of organisms outside their natural range, often with negative ecological and economic consequences. As cities are hubs of anthropogenic activities, with both highly transformed ...
    • How much evolutionary history in a 10x10m plot? 

      Proches, S.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Cowling, R.M. (2006)
      We use a fully dated phylogenetic tree of the angiospermfamilies to calculate phylogenetic diversity (PD) in four South African vegetation types with distinct evolutionary histories. Since the branch length values are in ...
    • Human usage in the native range may determine future genetic structure of an invasion: insights from Acacia pycnantha 

      Le Roux, J.J.; Richardson, D.M.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Ndlovu, J. (BioMed Central Ltd, 2013)
      Background: The influence of introduction history and post-introduction dynamics on genetic diversity and structure has been a major research focus in invasion biology. However, genetic diversity and structure in the ...
    • Human-mediated introductions of Australian acacias – a global experiment in biogeography 

      Richardson, D.M.; Carruthers, J.; Hui, C.; Impson, F.A.C.; Miller, J.T.; Robertson, R.P.; Rouget, M.; Le Roux, J.J.; Wilson, J.R.U. (Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2011)
      Aim Australian acacias (1012 recognized species native to Australia, which were previously grouped in Acacia subgenus Phyllodineae) have been moved extensively around the world by humans over the past 250 years. This has ...
    • Identifying safe cultivars of invasive plants: six questions for risk assessment, management, and communication 

      Datta, A.; Kumschick, S.; Geerts, S.; Wilson, J.R.U. (2020)
      The regulation of biological invasions is often focussed at the species level. However, the risks posed by infra- and inter-specific entities can be significantly different from the risks posed by the corresponding species, ...
    • The importance of pollinators and autonomous self-fertilisation in the early stages of plant invasions: Banksia and Hakea (Proteaceae) as case studies 

      Moodley, D.; Geerts, S.; Richardson, D.M.; Wilson, J.R.U. (German Botanical Society and the Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands, 2016)
      Reproduction is a crucial stage in the naturalisation of introduced plant species. Here, using breeding system experiments and observations of floral visitors, we investigate whether a lack of pollinators or an inability ...
    • Improving Darwin Core for research and management of alien species 

      Groom, Q.; Desmet, P.; Reyserhove, L.; Adriaens, T.; Oldoni, D.; Vanderhoeven, S.; Baskauf, S.J.; Chapman, A.; McGeoch, M.; Walls, R.; Wieczorek, J.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Zermoglio, P.F.F.; Simpson, A. (2019)
      To improve the suitability of the Darwin Core standard for the research and management of alien species, the standard needs to express the native status of organisms, how well established they are and how they came to ...
    • Incorporating risk mapping at multiple spatial scales into eradication management plans 

      Kaplan, H.; van Niekerk, A.; le Roux, J.J.; Richardson, D.M.; Wilson, J.R.U. (Springer, 2014)
      The success of pro-active management of invasive plants depends on the ability to rapidly detect invasive populations and individuals. However, the factors important for detection depend on the spatial scale examined. We ...
    • Indicators for monitoring biological invasions at a national level 

      Wilson, J.R.U.; Faulkner, K.T.; Rahlao, S.J.; Richardson, D.M.; Zengeya, T.A.; van Wilgen, B.W. (British Ecological Society, 2018)
      1. A major challenge for the management of biological invasions is to ensure that data and information from basic inventories and ecological research are used alongside data from the monitoring and evaluation of interventions ...
    • Initiating dialogue between scientists and managers of biological invasions 

      Shaw, J.D.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Richardson, D.M. (Springer, 2010)
      We describe an initiative to improve the flow of information between researchers and managers as part of two international scientific symposia on biological invasions held in South Africa in 2008 and 2009. Formal ...