Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSu, Min
dc.contributor.authorHui, Cang
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yanyu
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zizhen
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-15T09:14:11Z
dc.date.available2009-08-15T09:14:11Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationSu, M., Hui, C., Zhang, Y. & Li, Z. (2008) Spatiotemporal dynamics of the epidemic transmission in a predator-prey system. Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, 70: 2195-2210.en
dc.identifier.issn0092-8240en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/408
dc.description.abstractEpidemic transmission is one of the critical density-dependent mechanisms that affect species viability and dynamics. In a predator-prey system, epidemic transmission can strongly affect the success probability of hunting, especially for social animals. Predators, therefore, will suffer from the positive density-dependence, i.e., Allee effect, due to epidemic transmission in the population. The rate of species contacting the epidemic, especially for those endangered or invasive, has largely increased due to the habitat destruction caused by anthropogenic disturbance. Using ordinary differential equations and cellular automata, we here explored the epidemic transmission in a predator-prey system. Results show that a moderate Allee effect will destabilize the dynamics, but it is not true for the extreme Allee effect (weak or strong). The predator-prey dynamics amazingly stabilize by the extreme Allee effect. Predators suffer the most from the epidemic disease at moderate transmission probability. Counter-intuitively, habitat destruction will benefit the control of the epidemic disease. The demographic stochasticity dramatically influences the spatial distribution of the system. The spatial distribution changes from oil-bubble-like (due to local interaction) to aggregated spatially scattered points (due to local interaction and demographic stochasticity). It indicates the possibility of using human disturbance in habitat as a potential epidemic-control method in conservation.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the National Social Science Foundation of China (04AJL007) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30700100). C.H. also acknowledges the support from “Chunhui Project” (Department of Education, China) and from the DST-NRF Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology, South Africa.en
dc.format.extent970994 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectEco-epidemiologyen
dc.subjectCellular automatonen
dc.subjectOrdinary differential equationsen
dc.subjectProbability transition modelen
dc.subjectDiscrete event modelen
dc.titleSpatiotemporal dynamics of the epidemic transmission in a predator-prey systemen
dc.typeJournal Articlesen
dc.cibjournalBulletin of Mathematical Biologyen
dc.cibprojectNAen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record