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dc.contributor.authorHui, Cang
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-25T09:23:02Z
dc.date.available2010-05-25T09:23:02Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.issn0022-5193en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/549
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding how species distribution (occupancy and spatial autocorrelation) and association (that is, multi-species co-distribution) change across scales is fundamental to unlocking the pattern formation in population ecology and macroecology. Based on the Bayesian rule and join-count statistics, I present here a mathematical model that can demonstrate the effect of spatial scale on the observation of species distribution and association. Results showed that the intensity of spatial autocorrelation and species association declines when the grain in the spatial analysis increases, although the category of species distribution (aggregated or segregated) and association (positive or negative) remains the same. Random distribution and species independence were proved to be scale-free. Regardless of the possible patterns of species distribution and association, species tend to be randomly distributed and independent from each other when scaling-up (an increasing grain), reflecting a percolation process. This model, thus, grasps the statistical essence of species scaling pattern and presents a step forward for unveiling mechanisms behind species distributional and macroecological patterns.en
dc.description.sponsorshipI am grateful to M.A. McGeoch, B. Laniewski, K.J. Gaston, A.L. ˇSizling, M.A. Lewis and two anonymous referees for constructive comments, the NRF Blue Skies Research Programme and the DST- NRF Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology for financial support.en
dc.format.extent385288 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectSpatial scaleen
dc.subjectAutocorrelationen
dc.subjectCo-occurrenceen
dc.subjectJoin-count statisticsen
dc.subjectPair approximationen
dc.subjectBayesian modelen
dc.subjectAggregationen
dc.subjectSpatial dissociationen
dc.subjectBeta diversityen
dc.titleOn the scaling patterns of species spatial distribution and associationen
dc.typeJournalArticlesen
dc.cibjournalJournal of Theoretical Biologyen
dc.cibprojectSpatial concordance in diversity and its temporal changeen


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