• The acaricidal effect of ethanolic extracts of Chenopodium quinoa Willd. on Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). 

      Harder, M.J.; Tello, V.E.; Giliomee, J.H. (Entomological Society of Southern Africa, 2016)
      Ethanolic extracts obtained from the seed coat of Chenopodium quinoa Willd. were evaluated for their acaricidal effect on different stages of the carmine spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch. At 72 h after application of ...
    • Accounting for imperfect observation and estimating true species distributions in modelling biological invasions 

      Mang, T.; Essl, F.; Moser, D.; Karrer, G.; Kleinbauer, I.; Dullinger, S. (Nordic Society Oikos, 2017)
      The documentation of biological invasions is often incomplete with records lagging behind the species’ actual spread to a spatio-temporally heterogeneous extent. Such imperfect observation bears the risk of underestimating ...
    • Alien plant invasions in European woodlands 

      Wagner, V.; Chytry, M.; Jimenez-Alfaro, B.; Pergl, J.; Hennekens, S; et al.; Pysek, P. (John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2017)
      Aim: Woodlands make up a third of European territory and carry out important ecosystem functions, yet a comprehensive overview of their invasion by alien plants has never been undertaken across this continent. Location: ...
    • Alien plants invade more phylogenetically clustered community types and cause even stronger clustering 

      Lososová, Z.; de Bello, F.; Chytrý, M.; Kühn, I.; Pyšek, P.; Sádlo, J.; Winter, M.; Zelený, D. (John Wiley & Sonns, Ltd., 2015)
      Aim Several hypotheses postulate that species invasion is affected by an interplay between the phylogenetic position of the invading species and the phylogenetic structure of the invaded community type. Some of them ...
    • Alien versus native species as drivers of recent extinctions 

      Blackburn, T.M.; Bellard, C.; Ricciardi, A. (2019)
      Native plants and animals can rapidly become superabundant and dominate ecosystems, leading to claims that native species are no less likely than alien species to cause environmental damage, including biodiversity loss. ...
    • Annual monitoring reveals rapid upward movement of exotic plants in a montane ecosystem 

      Kalwij, J.M.; Robertson, M.P.; van Rensburg, B.J. (Springer, 2015)
      There is increasing evidence that invasive species are threating montane ecosystems globally. However, trends in species distribution are difficult to observe directly due to a lack of data with suitable spatio-temporal ...
    • Aspects of the breeding biology of Angola swallos Hirundo Angolensis in Uganda 

      Evans, S.W. (Animal Demography Unit, 2016)
      The dimensions of three nests were measured, and the time activity-budget of a pair of Angola Swallows Hirundo angolensis was monitored at a nest at a convention centre in Uganda. Two adult Angola Swallows tending to three ...
    • Assessing 3D photogrammetry techniques in craniometrics 

      Moshobane, M.C.; de Bruyn, P.J.N.; Bester, M.N. (Copernicus Gesellschaft MbH, 2016)
      Morphometrics (the measurement of morphological features) has been revolutionized by the creation of new techniques to study how organismal shape co-varies with several factors such as ecophenotypy. Ecophenotypy refers to ...
    • Assessing, with limited resources, the ecological outcomes of wetland restoration: a South African case 

      Kotze, D.C.; Tererai, F.; Grundling, P.-L. (Society for Ecological Restoration, 2019)
      Resources for evaluating the ecological outcomes of ecosystem restoration projects are often limited, especially within government-funded programs. In order to rapidly assess the ecological outcomes ofwetland restoration, ...
    • Australian acacias: Weeds or useful trees? 

      Low, T. (Springer, 2012)
      By promoting Australian acacias to the developing world, aid and development agencies are failing to learn from the mistakes made with mesquite (Prosopis juliflora) and jatropha (Jatropha curcas)— two plants with weedy ...
    • Autofertility and self-compatibility moderately benefit island colonization of plants 

      Razanajatovo, M.; van Kleunen, M.; Kreft, H.; Dawson, W.; Essl, F.; Pergl, J.; Pysek, P.; Winter, M.; Weigelt, P. (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2019)
      Aim: The current geographical distribution of species largely reflects colonization success after natural long‐distance dispersal or introduction by humans. Plants with selfing ability should have an advantage when ...
    • Beta diversity of urban floras among European and non-European cities. 

      La Sorte, F.A.; Aronson, M.F.J.; Williams, N.S.G.; Celesti-Grapow, L.; Cilliers, S.; Clarkson, B.D.; Dolan, R.W.; Hipp, A.; Klotz, S.; Kuhn, I.; Pysek, P.; Siebert, S.; Winter, M. (John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2014)
      Aim Cities represent an ideal study system for assessing how intensive land-use change and biotic interchange have altered beta diversity at broad geographic extents. Here we test the hypothesis that floras in cities located ...
    • Biodiversity redistribution under climate change: Impacts on ecosystems and human well-being 

      Pecl, G.T.; Araujo, M.B.; Bell, J.D.; Blanchard, J.; Bonebrake, T.C.; Chen, I.C.; Clark, T.D.; Colwell, R.K.; Danielsen, F.; Evengard, B.; Falconi, L.; Ferrier, S.; Frusher, S.; Garcia, R.A.; Griffis, R.B.; Hobday, A.J.; Janion-Scheepers, C.; et al. (American Association for the Advancement of Science(AAAS), 2017)
      Distributions of Earth’s species are changing at accelerating rates, increasingly driven by human-mediated climate change. Such changes are already altering the composition of ecological communities, but beyond conservation ...
    • Bioinsecticide and leaf litter combination increases oviposition and reduces adult recruitment to create an effective ovitrap for Culex mosquitoes 

      Bellile, K.G.; Vonesh, J.R. (John Wiley & Sons Inc, 2016)
      Mosquito egg traps, aquatic habitats baited with oviposition attractant and insecticide, are important tools for surveillance and control efforts in integrated vector management programs. The bioinsecticide Bacillus ...
    • Biological Flora of the British Isles: Ambrosia artemisiifolia 

      Essl, F.; Biró, K.; Brandes, D.; Broennimann, O.; Bullock, J.M.; Chapman, D.S.; Chauvel, B.; Dullinger, S.; Fumanal, B.; Guisan, A.; Karrer, G.; Kazinczi, G.; Kueffer, C.; Laitung, B.; Lavoie, C.; Leitner, M.; Mang, T.; Moser, D.; Müller-Schärer, H.; Petitpierre, B.; Richter, R.; Schaffner, U.; Smith, M.; Starfinger, U.; Vautard, R.; Vogl, G.; von der Lippe, M.; Follak, S. (British Ecological Society, 2015)
      1. This account presents information on all aspects of the biology of Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. (Common ragweed) that are relevant to understanding its ecology. The main topics are presented within the standard framework ...
    • Body size changes in passerine birds introduced to New Zealand from the UK 

      Blackburn, T.M.; Monroe, M.J.; Lawson, B.; Cassey, P.; Ewen, J.G. (Pensoft, 2013-06-28)
      One feature of global geographic variation in avian body sizes is that they are larger on isolated islands than on continental regions. Therefore, this study aims to assess whether there have been changes in body size ...
    • Boom-bust dynamics in biological invasions: towards an improved application of the concept 

      Strayer, D.L.; D'Antonio, C.M.; Essl, F.; Fowler, M.S.; Geist, J.; Hilt, S.; Jarić, I.; Jöhnk, K.; Jones, C.G.; Lambin, X.; Latzka, A.W.; Pergl, J.; Pyšek, P.; Robertson, P.; von Schmalensee, M.; Stefansson, R.A.; Wright, J.; Jeschke, J.M. (John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS, 2017)
      Boom-bust dynamics – the rise of a population to outbreak levels, followed by a dramatic decline – have been associated with biological invasions and offered as a reason not to manage troublesome invaders. However, boom-bust ...