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dc.contributor.authorProches, S.
dc.contributor.authorWilson, J.R.U.
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, D.M.
dc.contributor.authorRejmánek, M.
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-03T12:41:20Z
dc.date.available2010-11-03T12:41:20Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationProches, S., Wilson, J.R.U., Richardson, D.M. and Rejmanek, M. (2008). Searching for phylogenetic pattern in biological invasions. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 17, 5-10en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/751
dc.description.abstractIt has been suggested that alien species with close indigenous relatives in the introduced range may have reduced chances of successful establishment and invasion (Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis). Studies trying to test this have in fact been addressing four different hypotheses, and the same data can support some while rejecting others. In this paper, we argue that the phylogenetic pattern will change depending on the spatial and phylogenetic scales considered. Expectations and observations from invasion biology and the study of natural communities are that at the spatial scale relevant to competitive interactions, closely related species will be spatially separated, whereas at the regional scale, species in the same genera or families will tend to co-occur more often than by chance. We also argue that patterns in the relatedness of indigenous and naturalized plants are dependent on the continental/ island setting, spatial occupancy levels, and on the group of organisms under scrutiny. Understanding how these factors create a phylogenetic pattern in invasions will help us predict which groups are more likely to invade where, and should contribute to general ecological theory.en
dc.description.sponsorshipCentre of Excellence for Invasion Biologyen
dc.format.extent307328 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltden
dc.subjectBiological invasionsen
dc.subjectcompetitionen
dc.subjectDarwin’s naturalization hypothesisen
dc.subjectinvasibilityen
dc.subjectinvasion biologyen
dc.subjectinvasivenessen
dc.subjectnaturalizationen
dc.subjectnicheen
dc.subjectphylogenetic resolutionen
dc.subjectspatial scaleen
dc.titleSearching for phylogenetic pattern in biological invasionsen
dc.typeJournalArticlesen
dc.cibjournalGlobal Ecology and Biogeographyen
dc.cibprojectNAen


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