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dc.contributor.authorWilson, J.R.U.
dc.contributor.authorDormontt, E.E.
dc.contributor.authorPrentis, P.J.
dc.contributor.authorLowe, A.J.
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, D.M.
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-08T08:54:48Z
dc.date.available2010-11-08T08:54:48Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationWilson, J.R.U., Dormontt, E.E., Prentis, P.J., Lowe, A.J. and Richardson, D.M. (2009). Something in the way you move: dispersal pathways affect invasion success. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 24(3), 136-144en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/779
dc.description.abstractBiological invasions are caused by human-mediated extra-range dispersal and, unlike natural extra-range dispersal, are often the result of multiple introductions from multiple sources to multiple locations. The processes and opportunities that result in propagules moving from one area to another can be used more broadly to differentiate all types of extra-range dispersal. By examining key properties of dispersal pathways (notably propagule pressure, genetic diversity and the potential for simultaneous movement of coevolved species), the establishment and evolutionary trajectories of extrarange dispersal can be better understood. Moreover, elucidation of the mechanistic properties of dispersal pathways is crucial for scientists and managers who wish to assist, minimise or prevent future movements of organisms.en
dc.description.sponsorshipCentre of Excellence for Invasion Biologyen
dc.format.extent1188377 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd.en
dc.titleSomething in the way you move: dispersal pathways affect invasion successen
dc.typeJournalArticlesen
dc.cibjournalTrends in Ecology and Evolutionen
dc.cibprojectNAen


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