Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFoxcroft, L.C.
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-25T09:05:02Z
dc.date.available2010-11-25T09:05:02Z
dc.date.created2007en
dc.date.issued2010-11-25T09:05:02Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/827
dc.descriptionVarious existing datasets that had not been previously analysed, which had been collected across Kruger over a period of time were used in this project. Location: The data is stored in two places, the internal SANParks Geospatial Server (ssktgis7) and SANParks Online Data Repository (http://dataknp.sanparks.org/sanparks/). Description: South African National Parks (SANParks) has a wide range of field data collection needs aimed at monitoring the state of the environment. To ensure accuracy of these data is preserved and the collection process standardised, a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) software application called CyberTracker (http://www.cybertracker.org) is customised for each of our 22 National Parks. Each program is icon-based allowing both literate as well as non-literate field workers to record observations with latitude and longitude co-ordinates using a PDA device with an integrated Global Positioning System (GPS). As a result, we are able to monitor ranger patrols; vegetation condition; animal behaviour; rare and endangered species and invasive species distributions and more. For general information on the SANParks CyberTracker programme see - http://www.sanparks.org/parks/kruger/conservation/scientific/gis/cybertracker.php I made use of the alien species records from this programme, which I used to assess the importance of spatial scales in monitoring and managing invasive species, and also, examining the role of propagule pressure in invasions. Contact details: SANParks GIS-RS Analyst: Sandra MacFadyen (sandramf@sanparks.org) SAPIA: One chapter used data from the national South African Plant Invaders Atlas (http://www.arc.agric.za/home.asp?pid=1033 or http://www.agis.agric.za/wip/ ).en
dc.description.abstractBiological invasions are a significant ecological and economic global crisis. Protected areas also suffer from the increased burden that invasions place on their resources and the impacts placed on the ecosystem. However, management requires an ecological foundation which can inform best practice and optimize its responses. I explored the patterns and processes of invasion in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa; a large national park situated in the Lowveld savanna ecosystem. I used spatially-explicit alien plant data at various scales from: a national database, the whole of KNP, a specific region, river system, and small scale plots in one invaded area of KNP. Using various statistical techniques, primarily classification and regression tree analysis, logistic regression, ANOVA, Nestedness and spatial pattern analysis, I assessed the relationship between the patterns observed at a specific spatial grain and extent, discussing the implications for invasion ecology and management. Using this knowledge and conceptual tools, I developed a new framework and model which contributes to invasion theory. Scale is a critical component in evaluating alien plant invasions. Without careful consideration of scale, studies from different scenarios cannot be compared and the science of invasion ecology will not advance. I provide a framework for assessing the risks of plant invasions in a watershed, using both an area- and species-approach, highlighting areas of current and future potential concern. I also explore the role of intentional introduction of ornamental plants and discuss management approaches for dealing with this. Evaluating a riparian system provides insights into how different patches in a landscape are differentially invaded, and how patch type characteristics need to be considered carefully for management and monitoring. I also describe how reconstructing the invasion history of a species, complemented by fine scale assessment, provides insights into species-specific spread models, and also how these types of studies can input into general theories, such as the role of propagule pressure. These components together provide insight into the dynamics of alien plant invasions in an African savanna and protected area system.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityFoxcroft, Llewellyn C
dc.format.extent27899397 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsotheren
dc.subjectplant invasionen
dc.subjectsavannaen
dc.subjectscaleen
dc.subjectprotected areaen
dc.subjectKruger National Parken
dc.subjectriparian ecosystemsen
dc.subjectOpuntia strictaen
dc.subjectornamental plantsen
dc.titlePattern and process of plant invasion in an African savanna ecosystemen
dc.mdidentification.purposePhD Thesisen
dc.mdidentification.organizationnameSouth African National Parks, and Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biologyen
dc.mdidentification.deliverypointFaculty of Science, Natural Sciences Building, Private Bag X1, Stellenbosch University, Matielanden
dc.mdidentification.postalcode7602en
dc.mdidentification.phone0218082832en
dc.mdidentification.electronicmailaddresskcd@sun.ac.zaen
dc.mddataidentification.languageEnglishen
dc.mdusage.specificusageThesisen
dc.mdusage.usagedatetime2007
dc.mdlegalconstraints.accessconstraintsotheren
dc.mdlegalconstraints.otherconstraintsThesis is archived at the University of Cape Town (UCT), and subject to the UCT rules and regulations of use. Journal publications or book chapters are either under copyright of publisher or author.en
dc.dqcompletenessomission.valueunitPercentageen
dc.mdmaintenanceinformation.maintenanceandupdatefrequencyUnknownen
dc.mdfeaturecataloguedescription.cataloguedate2010-11-25
dc.mddistributor.distributorcontactSouth African National Parksen
dc.mdformat.nameVaries per thesis chapteren
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.westboundlongitude30en
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.eastboundlongitude32en
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.northboundlattitude-22en
dc.exgeographicboundingbox.southboundlattitude-25.5en
dc.exverticalextent.minimumvalue150en
dc.exverticalextent.maximumvalue600en
dc.exverticalextent.unitofmeasuremetersen
dc.cibprojectDeterminants of invasion and scenarios of changeen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record