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dc.contributor.authorFoxcroft, L.C.
dc.contributor.authorDowney, P.O.
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-26T10:09:30Z
dc.date.available2010-11-26T10:09:30Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationFoxcroft, L.C. & P.O. Downey. 2008. Protecting biodiversity by managing alien plants in national parks- perspectives from South Africa and Australia. In B. Tokarska-Guzik, J. Brock, G. Brundu, L. Child, C. Daehler, P. Pyšek (Eds). Plant Invasions. Human perception, ecological impacts and management. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, The Netherlands. Pp 387-403.en
dc.identifier.isbn978-90-5782-188-2.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/836
dc.description.abstractConservation of biodiversity, in all its facets and fluxes, is the primary motivation for the development of protected areas. However, designating land as a protected area does not necessarily result in the conservation of biodiversity, as a range of threats to biodiversity may still be active. For example, invasive alien plants pose a significant threat to biodiversity position, structure and function,irrespective of protected area status. Thus the threat of invasive species to biodiversity needs to be addressed as part of a holistic conservation strategy for any protected area. Such a holistic approach must not only consider the invasive species within such areas, but also those species that transcend park boundaries. Here we describe the approaches developed by two organisations that manage protected areas, namely, South Africa’s Kruger National Park and the National Parks of New South Wales Australia, and detail their progress towards the management of invasive alien plants for conservation. The key components of the various management frameworks are presented here to illustrate how each has independently addressed the problem of alien plant management and how components from each could be used collectively.en
dc.description.sponsorshipDST/NRF Centre for Invasion Biology. South African National Parks. Department of Environment and Conservation, New South Wales, Australia.en
dc.format.extent1194164 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBackhuys Publishers, Leiden, The Netherlands.en
dc.subjectbiodiversityen
dc.subjectconservationen
dc.subjectadaptive managementen
dc.subjectKruger National Parken
dc.titleProtecting biodiversity by managing alien plants in national parks: perspectives from South Africa and Australiaen
dc.typeBookChapteren


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